Whit Fosburgh Interviewed on Bass Pro’s Outdoor World With Host Rob Keck

Whit Fosburgh Interviewed on Bass Pro’s Outdoor World With Host Rob Keck


welcome in to Bass Pro Shops Outdoor
World brought to you by bass pro shops if you love fishing hunting and the
great outdoors and want to make it even better
you’re in the right place with host Rob ken your adventure starts right here
good morning and welcome and thanks for tuning in to Bass Pro Shops Outdoor
World brought to you by bass pro shops were truly your adventure starts right
here I’m Rob Keck your host and hey what a great show we have for you today and
happy November the second I can’t believe it’s the 11th month of the year
and you know the beauty of the fall seasons upon us cooler temperatures
leaves have fallen way up north and you know continue that color change right
through through this month and you know out west
they’ve lost lost leaves but you know it’s still turning colors here in the
south it’s really pretty and for you know for many of us that’s primetime
hunting season yet for others it’s time to wet a line for some fabulous fall
fishing it’s time for giving thanks and time for get well the anticipation of
our celebration of the coming Christmas season it’s a time for families to to
gather in hunting camps a gather around the Thanksgiving turkey and just simply
sit next to the fireplace it’s my favorite time of year I love the smell
the chill the thrill and all that yet to come on today’s show we’re gonna talk
about hunting fishing and some very important conservation work being done
to preserve our time-honored traditions by the Theodore Roosevelt conservation
partnership and its president and CEO Witt fosberg but before we meet today’s
guests I just want to remind you that in nine days November 11th it’s Veterans
Day and it’s an important day to remember remembering those brave men and
women veterans of our military served both during wartime and peace that have
sacrificed for our precious freedoms that we enjoy right here in the United
States of America as we know freedoms not free and freedom has come at a very
high price of the lives of so many freedom is the envy of so many around
the world and Bass Pro Shops we salute our military veterans and we’ve got a
ten percent military discount that’s available start
right there on Veterans Day running through the 22nd bailable to all active
duty and retired military personnel just show your valid military photo ID and
check out and receive that 10% discount we salute you and well here for the
first segment of a show as we begin every month bring us more about the many
fun activities happening at Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s our Communications
Manager Katie Mitchell Katie happy November and it’s time to stoke up the
fireplace boy he is here today in Springfield Missouri let me tell you but
you know speaking of family and fun and Christmas coming and everything now that
Halloween’s past it is time to talk about Christmas it’s fair game as usual
here we come back again for the 11th season now are really crazy popular
Santa’s Wonderland returning to Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s across the nation the
jolly old elf is going to arrive at all Bass Pro and Cabela’s stores Saturday
November the 16th beginning at 5 p.m. and of course all the fun and free
activities crafts games free photos with Santa you can get them right there at
your bass pro shops and Cabela’s through Tuesday December the 24th kids can come
write a letter telling Santa what they want
play games remote-controlled trucks laser foam arcade Lincoln Logs always a
favorite it’s that time of year hey nascar man are we ever happy about
martin truex in that final four tell us what’s happening this weekend well this
weekend we’re going to Texas where everything’s bigger and better in Texas
but yeah Martin doesn’t need to worry he’s already punched his ticket to be in
the Final Four at Homestead he’s won his third playoff race that’s that’s just
crazy he’s really on fire and we wish him the best at Texas Motor Speedway
this weekend yep outdoor adventures boy we’ve got something new here nationwide
program why don’t you tell us about how we’re getting youth outdoors here in
this final little bit know anything about Bass Pro Shops and our founder
Johnny Morris you know that this is this is his passion getting kids and the
outdoors getting everybody in the outdoors but you got to start them early
we’re very excited this is a brand new program it launches today it launches
today November the second Ken I am over there at our store in the
Houston area is going to be at our perryland location but if that’s just
the first of many to come well it’s called the outdoor adventures
program and we’re partnering up with a local YMCA s in the area the National
Wildlife Federation and the Bass Pro Shops and we’re kicking off this program
to try getting kids about urban kids don’t often get a chance to get in the
outdoors but they’re going to be able to come to either the YMCA de Saturday
today they can they can go to Bass Pro Shops and they’re going to be able to
try their hand at archery and setting up a pant and a campfire and see what’s all
involved in nature hiking and even do some fishing it’s it’s all this grand
effort that we’re putting out we hope to get thirteen stores open the next three
years with this program it’s part of the after after-school program so be looking
for that to come to your area starts this today at Houston at the pear land
location at 10 a.m. come join kids from the West Orem YMCA along with National
Wildlife Federation and Bass Pro and let’s get those kids outdoors to create
a future generation of conservation stewards while exciting Katy it’s so
important we get these people outdoors to connect with nature to get their
fingers into the dirt well look thanks so much
great job as always I’m so excited for you Thanksgiving coming up I hope you
have one of the best ever well folks that’s gonna take it to her first break
we return going to introduce our next guest for the rest of the show the
president CEO of the Theodore Roosevelt conservation partnership whit fosberg
Fitz and a whole lot more coming right up and I’m Rob Keck your host right here
on Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World only on roll radio sirius 147 we’ll be back in a moment – Bass Pro
Shops Outdoor World right here on rural radio on Sirius XM back to Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World
right here on rural radio on Sirius XM and welcome back to Bass Pro Shops
outdoor world right here in roll radio if you’ve just tuned in we’re
introducing our next guest we’re gonna be visiting with whit Foss Berg and talk
about the organization he leads as the president and CEO of the theodore
roosevelt conservation partnership well first i went to the website of the
organization and and i was really impressed with what it said it said we
helped create federal policy and funding solutions by uniting our partners and
amplifying the voices of the american sportsmen and women in service of
theodore roosevelt’s conservation legacy while in the political arena he
succeeded in making conservation a top-tier national issue
well TR had the foresight to address these issues still so significant to
sportsmen and women today and understanding that if we want a
safeguard critical habitat productive hunting grounds and our favorite fishing
holes for future generations we must plan carefully today and here to share
with us the work of this important organization is the president and CEO of
a good friend Witt fosberg Witt welcome to outdoor world radio Rob it’s great to
be with you again well I’ve got to ask you
Roosevelt’s words back in 1912 that there can be no greater issue than that
of conservation in this country does it ring as true today as it did back then I
think certainly for me it does and I think for the country it does even if
folks don’t quite recognize it I mean you think about our sporting traditions
are really a part of what makes America great the North American model of
wildlife conservation it was the envy of the world you know we have you think
about where we were back in Theodore Roosevelt’s time a whitetail deer were
almost gone there were almost gone oh we’re almost gone Buffalo essentially
were gone turkeys were gone yeah so and you know when under Roosevelt’s vision
we create system in this country not only brought
those species back and created the modern hunting and fishing culture we
have migrated out for recreation economy but it also provided everybody else with
clean air clean water no healthy outdoor lifestyle you know the problem is that
you know as we’ve gotten more urban as a society you know people get less
connected Lance I’ve got kids you know it’s harder to get them to you know get
outside and to pay attention and then we have our lawmakers to which used to be
largely you know rural or semi-rural there are now a largely urban and so
we’ve lost that connection and so that’s where I think we see some of that
slippage in terms of people not quite recognizing how important this is to the
country how ingrained with our traditions it is and how ingrained in
our economy yeah you’re spotl and wolf in your
opinion do you think we can ever get it elevated back to that level that
Roosevelt made it as a top-tier and if so how would we do it yeah I mean I
think we can and I think that you know listen we’re not facing the crisis that
we faced back then that Roosevelt saw at best in a lot of ways we’ve become
complacent I mean everybody alive today have sad the benefit of enjoying public
once we’ve had plentiful game populations for most of people’s lives
we got clean air we’ve got clean water you know not many people remember the
Cuyahoga River on fire back in the 1970s and you know so there’s not that threat
people don’t understand you know how much effort went to get us to where we
are today and they’ve become complacent so that when that happens we invite back
so we invite people to come out with notions about getting rid of our public
lands about weakening your environmental box yeah we invite you know the
impedance of the world to come forward because people don’t understand how
important the hunting is for example and you know wildlife management so I think
that get back to where we were we have to engage we have to make our voices
heard again and we can’t become complacent we need to set aside our
petty arguments you know if you’re a fly fisherman a thin fisherman a bow hunter
rifle hunter now put that aside and focus on the big picture and regain that
voice that we had there for much of it a century well that’s why organizations
like TRC P are so important well we’re gonna just slide off of that for the
moment I just want to tell you it’s great to have you on the show and I must
ask have you been hunting or fishing this fall and if you have I want to know
where have you been and what have you hunted and fished for
all right so the the hunting starts week of Veterans Day and we have deer camp up
in the Adirondacks and that’s or the official beginning of my hunting season
and that’s been a tradition in our family literally since the 1800s fishing
I hit Montauk at the end of Easton the Long Island this time of year in the
fall October all the bait fish were there all the Predators come together
and this just mayhem I love it I try to hit that every year last week I was out
in Colorado doing a little late season fly-fishing
which was phenomenal but now pretty much yeah beginning right now the focus
attends first the hunting for the majority of the winter and then just
back to fishing come spring you know you mentioned about a tradition there in the
Adirondacks with deer camp tell me just a little bit about that
that is of great interest to me because in so many places we’ve lost traditions
tell us about the one that you’re part of so this is we have a little Club up
there was created in the 1880s and at that time you know the Adirondacks were
kind of a mess and it was really the first real effort to create a
large-scale public lands because they’ve been clear-cut there were fires was
affecting water quality all the way down to New York City
Albany Troy and so the state legislature created essentially a forever wild you
know in brown a six million acre of swamp in the Adirondacks and around that
time you know a bunch of private clubs were created too so you have this mixed
about three million acres of public lands three million private lands and
our place has not changed a whole lot since the 1880s other in fact we do have
letting water and electricity which is really good but we’re super remote out
there you know there may be buddies come to the Adirondacks knows this real low
deer densities so we may go a whole week and never see a buck and that’s that’s
fine but it’s that tradition that’s getting together with my
brother was a couple of buddies four buddies act and yeah we you know talk
hunting we’ve spent all day in the woods we cook for each other we buy a drink
cool bit too much but it’s just a phenomenal tradition that is great well
look we just have a minute here before we take our next break but what is about
hunting and fishing that’s important to you well I think two things I mean one I
love the challenge I love getting out there in beautiful places and bashing
with paddles that may be stalking a buck or it may be trying to convince the
trout to take something they think might be amazing that’s part of it you know
the other part is you know that is the getting together it’s a social app you
know that one week a year for deer camp that we set aside everything else I turn
off my phone that I put in that out of office message on my emails and we just
sort of have a great time for a week that rejuvenates us literally for the
next year so I think it’s both of those things the challenge as well as the
carotids yeah well you know many people getting ready for deer camp sort of talk
a little bit more about that later but with we’re gonna take our next break
when we return we’re gonna continue this visit we got a lot more coming right up
and I’m Rob Keck your host right here in Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World only enroll
radio sirius 147 thanks for joining us and we will be right back we’ll be back in a moment – Bass Pro
Shops Outdoor World right here on rural radio on Sirius XM back to Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World
right here on rural radio on Sirius XM and welcome back to Bass Pro Shops
Outdoor World right here in rural radio sirius 147 thanks for joining us in a
few just tuned in were privileged to have with us the president and CEO the
Theodore Roosevelt conservation partnership with fosberg you know what
we were talking about traditions we were talking about the passion that that you
have and you know where did where did that passion for hunting and fishing
begin it had to had to be sparked someplace somewhere
tell us about that I didn’t know I was lucky at the time but I grew up in the
woods in upstate New York my dad went from the conservation
department he was a better angler we lived a couple miles back in a dirt road
we didn’t have any neighbors but we had a lot of woods we have trout streams ran
through our property and so my little brother and I literally from the time we
were pretty much walking on and we’re outfield fiddle around the woods and
that we had fly rods you know typically I was first many years it was a worm on
the end of the flour rod but it worked just fine but we were like you know sort
of learn to you know enjoy that as a little part of life that’s what we did
that’s how we entertained herself we didn’t really have TV reception so they
don’t feel and there’s no such thing as an Xbox Nintendo yeah so we were doing
is we were out you know making forts in the woods eventually then fishing and
moved to hunting after that and so it became pretty engrained in what we do my
brother works for the Park Service now yeah so he too followed that sort of
early you know passion we after just being outside and you know being a
nature well there’s no doubt that with us moving to a more urban society that
many kids don’t have that same opportunity like you and like I had of
being able to explore explore the outdoors in a way that I know when I
left after breakfast mom said make sure you’re back by dinnertime and you know
we’ve we took it upon ourselves to you know develop that fun weather
turning rocks in a stream or climbing a tree or you know taking her BB guns out
and you know it was just just something that you know was part of the growing up
and we’re so challenged today and I’m sure like you are like me you had some
early mentors and mentors that meant a lot to you as you were growing into the
career that you’re into today who were some of those early mentors and how did
they impact you you know the my dad passed away when I
was rather young is in high school only high school but he and his brother we’re big outdoorsmen you know they were
pretty well known in the community from the hunting and fishing world my dad started the
conservation they you know go out you know the wild places and eventually became the sort of experts on the Adirondacks and you know so they both passed away by
the time we were sort of figuring this stuff out so yeah I’d say there are
mentors in concept but really what we did was we got every issue of field of
scream outdoor life sports a field you know fly fisherman that we digested
every single word and then we went out there at least we’re taught ourselves to
learn and it’s not so we didn’t have those traditionally mentors I think a
lot of kids might but you know we had enough ingrained in our family of where
we lived and our mom was super supportive of it I mean she didn’t
really hunt or fish herself but she was more than happy to you know clean the
pylon fight we bring home it’s up like that and you know for a while at least
so I think that yeah with you know her willingness to sort of let us do that
kind of stuff and encourage it and then you know the fact that we were able to
access those resources and largely magazine form at that time you know
what’s huge for us yeah I can’t tell you how much I look forward to getting fur
Fish and Game Pennsylvania game news and other magazines which you’ve just
mentioned they had an impact on me as well what do you like better hunting or
fishing depends on the season all right now I’m getting fired up for deer camp
when that you know hatch is on the upper Delaware and I’m chasing big rainbows
be fishing that that’s the cool thing about this stuff mean when you’re in the
moment you know it’s the greatest thing ever that could be a turkey hunt or I’m
a South Dakota pheasant field and I just can’t imagine
it getting any better than that so that’s just think that’s the thing I
love about it is there’s so much diversity you know in hunting and
fishing you can always be doing something different or if it’s something
you just love you do the same thing and never gets old yeah um so yeah I think
that probably the boat I’m most passionate about that week of deer camp
but after that yeah well look we talked about how you and I both grew up having
a chance to to check out and and be engaged in the outdoors in rural America
but today with this urbanized society looking at recruitment then retention
reactivation are we making any progress on our three looking at all three of
those lessons don’t know what all three years I mean that’s you know basically
recruitment retention and deactivation and that’s essentially their you know
what keeps hunting and fishing live was fun and we’ve had some pretty disturbing
trends on the hunting side or field decrease participation fishing side is
going great actually we have a dip Wow and that was back up and I really think
the fishing community probably has got sacked together there’s something called
the recreational boating and fishing foundation which spends several million
dollars a year in sort of advertising voting of fishing a lot of folks have
seen the take me fishing campaign they take me boudin campaign there’s a
Hispanic part of that the follow softest car campaign and together are those have
really reversed that decline we’re seeing a whole bunch of new move Ladue
growth in the fishing side and largely as books they don’t look like us Rob I
mean it’s just an ik buddy it’s women it’s young folks and that’s been super
encouraging promise on the hunting stuff as we don’t have something like the
recreational boating fin Dacian because you know the way the laws are set up
pittman-robertson law which is the excise tax on hunting and fishing
hunting equipment including you know guns ammo archery equipment that pays
for conservation largely but back in the 1930s when that
past nobody thought we would actually go out and have to recruit new hunters I
mean everybody was hot sure and so you can’t use those funds for recruitment
now when the fishing side into the dingle Johnson you know act you know
that was all the fishing excise taxes they specifically allowed a portion of
that be used for a recruitment and engagement of the next generation now
we’re trying to get that law changed in Congress right now to allow the hunting
side to actually go out and market hunting which i think is going to be
necessary to reverse that decline we went from about 13 million hunters and
five years ago to around closer to 11 and a half million today and that is a
significant decline and we need to get that reversed not only because we want
people out there hunting but that pays for conservation America and if we have
people going away from the sport that directly impacts their the quality of
our lands the quality of our wildlife and the quality of our experience is up
yeah for sure well look we get back from this break I
want you to talk about how you got engaged in the work that you’re dealing
with your career path to where you are now so we’re gonna move to this break
we’ve got a lot more to talk about right here on Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World
only have role radios serious 147 thanks for joining us and we will be right back we’ll be back in a moment – Bass Pro
Shops Outdoor World right here on rural radio on Sirius XM back to Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World
right here on rural radio on Sirius XM and welcome back to Bass Pro Shops
Outdoor World right here rule radio and we would pick up where we left off with
the president the CEO of TRC P mr. wit fosberg you know wit you’ve been in the
conservation arena for quite a long time and you know so often I get questions
I’m sure you do from from young people maybe college age people or maybe people
looking for career changes on how did you get involved and so I’m going to
throw that out to you to ask if you would share how you got engaged in in
this work in the conservation arena and the career path that took you to where
you work right now that was not the path I had originally proceeded I went to
yeah I have to say what grew up in the woods then you affair about about her
practice and point forests and wildlife but then went to college in Washington
DC at Georgetown it was in government international relations nature he
basically got the end of four years of college and recognized I probably still
knew more about wildlife and you know the woods than I did about geopolitics I
loved you know the government aspect of it and so I decided to try to marry
those you know those two parts of it you know that interesting government
politics and history and with knowledge of wildlife and forests and everything
else and so a first job out of college with National Audubon Society and doing
writing for them and lobbying and then figured I need a little bit of formal
education and that you know just so I sort of whether I took with me will
growing up in the woods is probably not enough to actually build a career around
that so I went and got a master’s degree in environmental studies at the forestry
school and then came back worked on the hill for about five years doing energy
and environment policy went to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
ran their fisheries program which Atrato unlimited for 15 years you know running
you know the all their development side but also a lot of the conservation work
and then came over here in at ercp and 2010 and it’s been great and you know
I’ve been lucky to be able to marry my you know application with my vocation
and in terms of advice I give people is if you passionate about it and you can
make it work go for it because if you know again there was none I don’t
consider myself that special but it just things worked out and I decided to make
it work out and you’re willing to do that you’re willing to suffer you know
good pretty low paying job to start with eventually it can pay off yep for sure
well when we begin the segment there the second segment I shared with with our
listeners what I picked up from the website and helping create federal
policy and funding solutions by uniting partners and amplifying voices of the
American sportsmen and women in the service of Theodore Roosevelt’s
conservation legacy so why don’t you take it from there explain TR CP what it
is how it got started and where you’re looking to go in the future and you and I knew well with Jim range
and had been you know Howard Baker’s chief of staff now our vehicle is a
senator from Tennessee Republican majority leader of the Senate back in
the Reagan days and in both Jim and you know Baker were big hunters and
fishermen and Jim had been instrumental in writing a lot of the seminal
environmental laws of past the 1917 beast he’s a Clean Water Act there were
laws like that and over time he got really frustrated how he thought that
the a sensible center of the sporting community had always been played had
been lost he saw the environmental community moved
further to the left and become more democratically named more litigious he
saw the gun community moved further to the right the more public demanding more
litigious he just thought that whole swath in the middle had been vacated and
so he decided to create an organization that brought all the various groups that
worked on conservation together you know speak in the common voice they were too
big for any one quick Ag policy agriculture policy public lands policy
you name it and part of the problem too was a we were a victim of our own
success I mean you know Rob you spent many years
the Turkey Federation I mean it does amazing work bring in turkeys back feel
we have the rough grass side we’ve got business forever
yeah trout on them yeah bass all those groups do great stuff but the electively
we lost our eye on federal policy really was federal policy that was the
underpinning for everything that made those groups successful now funding
through things like the farm bill for conservation you know policy is around
clean water that Neal make good fishing possible I mean you name it it was sort
of there was a link is that federal side and Jim thought that that had gone away
and he wanted to get it back so today we have 60 different formal partner groups
that range from the usual suspects Ducks Unlimited pheasants forevers you try out
a limited bass but also Outdoor Industry Association nationally manufacturers
we’re trying to bring that business voice in develop policy and I think that
you know that’s a lot of hurting cats with 60 different groups in the room and
so first thing we do is agree to disagree
yeah they’re gonna be certain things that yeah we don’t agree on we’re just
going to park those at the door not worry about them we’re gonna focus on
what we need to and I think that you know that is you know that’s easier said
than done but it’s worked pretty well and the way we’ve really been successful
is the breaking of our weren’t any to work so that maybe you know agriculture
working that brings all the groups that really care about the farm bill together
to work on that to maybe a public lands working it maybe Marine Fisheries and
that is really where it all gets done you know so I think that you know again
this the coalition the Willing nobody pays dues and all we ask is that you
come in and you try your hardest you work collectively on these things
and add what your group brings well there’s no question that in today’s
world the politics of wildlife management the politics of conservation
are trumping the good science that has brought us to these glory days the
golden years of wildlife in this country and tell us about just briefly we
got about a minute and a half her before her next break but how do you engage
those partner groups to take on the politics that face the things that we
love the things we’ve just talked about well it’s a great question and a lot of
those groups don’t like to engage in those politics not terribly satisfying
to be a little bit ugly can be pretty acrimonious from time to time and we’re
not necessarily asking well we’re asking them to do is engage and listen they
want us to go in and lobby for them we’re happy to do it they want us to be
the bad guy in terms of laboratory quote in the press you know we can do that we
don’t want to take any group out of his comfort zone but we also want to make it
very clear but we need them to engage at whatever way they can and listen I mean
you know the part of the reason we’re successful is we don’t you know call
people names we’re not going to side with Republicans not gonna side with
Democrats we’re going to do what the resource is right for the resource you
know any as long as we keep our eye on that we’re gonna be successful one well
said well look right here to break when we come back I want to talk about some
of the greatest challenges that face conservation today and that brings us to
that next break we return going to continue our informative interview with
whit fosberg right here on Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World exclusive on roll
radio series 147 this Rob Keck and we will be right back we’ll be back in a moment – Bass Pro
Shops Outdoor World right here on rural radio on Sirius XM back to Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World
right here on rural radio on Sirius XM and we are back and thanks for tuning in
to Bass Pro Shops outdoor world right here in rural radio and if you’ve just
tuned in we’re privileged to have with us the president the CEO of TRC P Witt
fosberg you know Witt we face many challenges today and in the conservation
arena if you were to pick let’s say the top three or four what would they be
what are those greatest challenges that face conservation today possible just I
mean I’m gonna start with the hunting side I think chronic wasting disease is
the number one threat we’re facing right now you know it affects it’s in 26
states is 100% fatal there is no cure there never will be a cure you can
control it if you aggressively manage it but there is a sort of a cottage
industry out there of naysayers who claims a hoax created by the insurance
companies to reduce deer numbers you know and that’s all nonsense and if
people become afraid of eating their venison you know that is one place we’re
seeing good growth and hunting today is where that young folks who care about
lean protein locally sourced non-gmo whatever you want to talk about but
people who really have that sort of field to table mentality and I think
that we lose that you know in hunting and people are afraid to eat their meat
you know that is a we’re in a world of hurt on that I’ll say more on the
fishing side you know we’re starting to see much bigger issues in terms of water
quality loss of wetlands you talk about record dead zones and the Gulf of Mexico
yeah huge algal blooms off east and west of Florida we have big dead zone the
Chesapeake Bay I mean again we’ve got a little bit complacent about water
quality you know we’re seeing a weakening of some of the wetlands laws
water quality you know laws in this country and we’re also seeing a lot more
people out there you know our country grows every
and you know then that’s a bad combination so I think that you know
that water quality Act is a huge deal I’m gonna I’m gonna skip climate which
sort of runs over everything else but I will just talk generally about
development I think that you know we’ve all seen that sprawl of the urbanization
I mean places where you and I probably once hunted you know or you know parking
lots now and subdivisions so I mean that and even we’re sitting on our public
lands with things like energy development well you can do it you can
have your cake and eat it too you can you know develop some areas and not
impact your wildlife migrations for example but if you’re not thoughtful
about it you have huge impacts and we’ve sort seen a rush to development of late
and we’re seeing impacts from that not just on public lands but on private
lands too but I think the combination of you know development you know want you
know weakening on some of our laws and chronic waste newsies those are three of
the things that really keep me up at night
well chronic wasting disease it’s deer season right now across deer country
over many many states and you know its front and center most of the state
wildlife agencies have alerts out hunters are becoming more and more aware
of it transportation of deer cross state lines being prohibited in many cases why
don’t you share with our listeners how you’re working to stem the spread of
this disease we pulled the various deer groups together qdm a national Darryl
Aya’s Elk Foundation you know others and really you know sort of sequestered
everybody in a room for a couple of days and developed a federal plan on what’s
the what do we want to do to tackle this and then we’ve signed that national a
cooperative greement of national deer alliance essentially represent the deer
community in DC they’re really the first thing we’re trying to do is get more
money after the state agencies which were on the front lines of dealing with
this so they can actually do surveillance and testing so they know
what the problem is in their individual state until 2011 those states got about
15 million dollars collectively divvied up you know for
surveillance and testing that money got dried up we’re getting that back in
we’ve got it in the house side right now we think we’re going to get it in this
outside or at least in conference so that will again give the states the
ability to know where the disease is which is the first step to actually
addressing plus I know where it is then they can target certain areas you know
hit the deer a little bit harder again hunters can be a part of the solution
there but you have a state like Illinois that’s been really aggressive and doing
with it this kept in the background levels less than one percent in the
state like Wisconsin which has been one more schizophrenic and how its dealt
with it it’s a 50 percent prevalence a bunch of
those you know counties in southern Wisconsin which are in the heart of deer
hunt deer hunting in America the other thing we’re doing is we’ve got money in
the farm bill you know for a CWD research we also have money going to the
US Geological Survey for additional research on you know how its spread we
have a National Academy science study that’s going to be coming out in the
next year or so – assuming we got this bill passed in Congress – essentially
you know review the state of the science and identify what the research
priorities are and also put to bed hopefully this notion that this is a
hoax so those are some of the things that
we’re doing right now we also have in terms of Education we have a video on
our website TRC P o RG the Steve Rinella did for us that shows where the how on
earth can you bone out a deer in the woods a pretty simple thing but a lot of
hunters don’t know how to do it this walks you through step by step how to do
it because that’s like are you talking you tell me before the show started you
shot a doe this morning you know you’re not gonna take that to the taxidermist
probably and you know folks will typically if they know how to bone that
out there was and just bring the meat back and they’re leaving the most
infectious part of the animal if there is CWD out there not spreading it around
I mean by definition if you shoot an animal and you leave it where it is and
that’s animals see the bd+ you’re not spreading the disease but I leave that
animal there because it was already there yeah but then you know just if we
get this money through Congress and also there be a lot more testing stations out
there’ll be a lot easier for hunters to get out and get that you know deer
tested ideally if some of this research will lead to a good live or dead test so
like a pregnancy test ideally you go out there and you can test your deer on the
spot and see it has you’re not you don’t have to butcher the whole dane take it
home and wait for couple weeks to get the results back
from the state test yep so I think there’s a lot of stuff going on here
and I’m happy with the progress we’ve made last year on this but we need
hunters out there be part of the solution on this and really work with
our state Fish and Game agencies to do the right thing yep absolutely
but look we’re just about out of time in this thing we’ve got a minute we’re
gonna start into this next question I have obviously a lot of attentions paid
to our great public lands and with good reason but you know most of America’s in
private hands that you know is where most of our hunting and fishing takes
place when you look especially east of the Mississippi River what can we do to
create incentives for private landowners to conserve their lands and allow
hunting in fishing I just got about 45 seconds here we’ll take a break and we
come back to it with the subject topically and then we’ll get more detail
we come back but you know the first thing is you have the farm bill five
billion dollars for conservation on five it’s a single largest conservation
program this country calls and then you know and that has you know a lot of
implications both in terms of water quality in terms of hunting access and
if we can get that properly implemented that is the single best thing we can do
very good and we’re going to take our final break of the show hold that
thought we return gonna talk more about the important work of TRC P that’s a
whole lot more coming right up and you’re listening to Bass Pro Shops
Outdoor World only on roll radio sirius 147 this is Rob Keck and we will be
right back we’ll be back in a moment – Bass Pro
Shops Outdoor World right here on rural radio on Sirius XM back to Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World
right here on rural radio on Sirius XM and welcome back to our final segment of
Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World here in rural radio we’ve been having a
wonderful conversation and visit with the president CEO that Theodore
Roosevelt conservation partnership wit fosberg what did you want to add
anything else there on creating those incentives for private landowners you
mentioned the farm bill anything else you wanted to add well I just think that
listener need to understand just how important this is because we think about
the farm bill and we think about things like payments to farmers for commodities
we think about food stamps but five billion dollars for conservation that’s
really the heart of that whole bill in my mind and that is you’re not going to
go out there and tell it what a landowner of what they can or can’t do
generally you’re going to create incentives for them and do the right
thing for conservation and particularly now with you know farm prices down
across the country really you know this is more important that’s ever been yeah
so to the extent that we can you encourage landowners to enter some their
lands and the conservation programs like the Conservation Reserve Program you
know other programs like that we can do but one add more income you know on the
land to the farmer yes so they can stay on that land but to really create great
habitat make better water quality get all rest there’s also a program in that
farm bill you know that pays landowners open that land for public hunting and
fishing and that’s where you see with the Block Grant program in Montana
walk-in programs in other states that is funded through the farm bill as well
again that’s an incentive so farmer doesn’t have to do it but if they want
to they can go in turn and enter into an agreement with their state agency open
up get a payment for opening up that land hunting and fishing and also have
that state assume liability so if somebody is in there and they fall in a
ditch and break their leg you know the state assumes that liability so the
lender doesn’t have to worry about it so I think there was great on the accident
side and it’s great on the habitat side look at your website TRC piece fighting
to conserve the forage base for saltwater anglers
li on the East Coast and in the Gulf why don’t you talk more about this great
work that you’re involved with there so Rob is a great question it really goes
back to you know Bass Pro a founder Johnny Morris co-chair in a panel with
us a few years ago the really lay out a better vision for managing saltwater
fisheries for recreation plants and that was so-called Morris deal report which
you can find out our website too there were about six different tenets of that
most of which have been accomplished at this point including we passed the
modern fish act last year yeah whole idea is just to manage
commercial fisheries different in recreational fisheries because
fundamentally it could not be more different
the recreational fishing we love inefficiency we want as many people out
there they’re having a great time and not kill it all that many fish
yeah whereas if you’re on the commercial side is all about efficiency and one
system fits all just did not work now one of the tenants of that Morris teal
report was also we have to do a better job of maintaining that forage base if
we want to have good fishing in the oceans and for the East Coast that’s
large and then Hayden salt called bunker called pogey in the Gulf but it’s an
oily little fish that is no good to eat unless you’re a marine predator and a
striped balance your redfish weak fish blue fish all eight men hate and you
know we’re trying to change how that the old fishery is managed so instead of the
Oh basically figuring out there’s one company that you know basically kills
all the men Haydon on the East Coast is called a mega protein it’s owned by a
Canadian company called cooking districts and they catch you know
seventy you ever take cent of all the men Hayden every single year Ryan them
up into fish food and oil dipping the Canada to feed aquaculture salmon which
is also totally unsustainable and we’re trying to get that fishery managed
differently so instead of how many fish can you kill before you drive that stock
extinct let’s think about the other way what does the ecosystem need but a you
know trite vast need for whales need quarter Ospreys those are filter feeders
you know what is the you know they’re instrumental and maintaining water
quality in places like the Chesapeake Bay what
happens if you take a bunch of those fish out so try to have that fishery
managed an ecosystem turns so that we take into account so of what everything
else needs and then figure out based on that how many fish can you take out for
this industrial fishing and we’ve had a fight going on the Atlantic states
Marine Fisheries Commission for that past year they’re largely moving toward
ecological management and but it is not easy because you have an entrenched
interest here with expensive lobbyists lawyers fighting a bunch of us you know
disorganized recreational anglers but we’re making headway and I think we’re
going to make a lot more headway in the next year well speaking of headway I
think so many of us realize that it well it just seems that Washington’s broken
hyper-partisan certainly polarized how do you break through this and actually
accomplish something getting a bill passed and we only get about two minutes
left here give us your thoughts well I mean listen I think this is you know
conservation hunting fishing have always been non partisan issues I mean doesn’t
Maori a Republican Democrat these should be issues that transcend politics and I
think we’ve largely been successful making that case the last two years
almost all the really important things that Congress has gotten accomplished at
the net our scope big new public lands bill that you know reauthorize permanent
Land and Water Conservation Fund protected a bunch of different areas
made it very clear that all of our public lands are open for hunting and
fishing unless they’re specifically closed
we had the modern fish Act passed we had a change in how we pay for forest fires
in the West so fundamentally well improve the nation’s forest management
we had a deal on Colorado River Water Management that passed Congress I mean
these things don’t get a ton of attention but the reason they happen is
because in an area of hyper-partisanship our issues are one that we’re trying to
make the case that can bring folks together we can get something
accomplished whereas we’re failing as so many other areas look people are
listening out there saying how do I find out more about TRC P tell us about your
website how can they contact you when they want to be engaged with the work
you’re doing well listen we love anybody to get engaged you’re going to
OCP dot o-r-g and you know check out what we do if you want to make a
donation we love it because you know we we count on that
kind of stuff but we also just want you to sign up as an activist so there’s
something is happening in your state or you know in an area you care about you
know we can contact you to weigh in because we’ve got a hundred thousand
folks that have signed up as activists on our site and those guys are with
something’s moving fast in Congress we put out the call to them and you guys
are the first line of defense final 15 seconds give us a closing thought here
on today’s show hey listen I mean I think that you know it’s easy to get
down on some of the soft CWD pollution but these are the good all day I mean we
have great hunting and fishing in this country we have great access in this
country and let’s not take that for granted lesson engage and make sure that
we pass that down to our next generation Witt thanks for being with us today
sharing the role in the achievements of TRC P and so much more I wish you all
the best of luck and good luck when you’re up there in the Adirondacks it’s
here in the coming weeks so folks that’s gonna wrap it up right here and Bass Pro
Shops Outdoor World back next week same time 10:00 Eastern 9:00 central right
here in rural radio sirius 147 another show that you won’t want to miss and
until then i’m rob Keck of a bass pro shops where your adventure always starts
right here thanks for answering the call that called a conservation of preserving
a rich hunting fishing and trapping heritage – see you next week this has been Bass Pro Shops Outdoor
World talking all things outdoors brought to you by bass pro shops your
outdoor leader join us next Saturday and every Saturday for more special guests
and unique locations right here on rural radio the agribusiness and a western
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